By Al Jazeera Center for Studies

There is a strong likelihood that Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Turkish prime minister and head of the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), will run for the country’s presidency. Legally, Turkey must elect a new president before the end of August 2014; that is, before the end of the term of the incumbent president, Abdullah Gul. Following a constitutional amendment passed in 2010, the president will this year be, for the first time in the history of the Turkish republic, elected by the direct vote of the people, rather than by a majority of parliamentarians.

By Al Jazeera Center for Studies

In simultaneous dawn raids on 17 December 2013, Turkish police, acting on the orders of the leading public prosecutor in Istanbul, Zakaria Oz, arrested more than fifty people, including the mayor of Istanbul district Fatih; the head of one of the largest construction companies in the country; sons of the ministers of the interior, economy and the environment; a Turkish businessman of Azerbaijani origin; and the head of state-owned Khalq Bank, one of Turkey’s largest banks. The simultaneous arrests were alarming, but also significant given the links between this case and the Justice and Development Party (AKP) government, which gained favour among a large number of Turks for its economic achievements over the past decade, as well as its fight against corruption.

By Afro-Middle East Centre

Although the 30 March municipal elections in Turkey were meant to elect mayors and municipal council members, they were viewed by many as a referendum on the popularity of prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his Justice and Development Party (AKP). Earlier, in 2012, Erdogan had tried unsuccessfully to bring the elections forward by five months, to allow himself extra time to campaign for the presidential elections scheduled for August. However, with the AKP’s plans to transform Turkey into a presidential presidential system delayed, the municipal elections took on added significance.

By Ali Hussein Bakir

 Turkey approaches the Syrian crisis through a series of factors that it considers to be basic axioms. Among these is that the Syrian situation is a regional and international responsibility and not solely that of Turkey but that Turkey may intervene if it regards the Syrian crisis as a Turkish national security risk.

 

 By Raza Naeem 

‘And with the pencil which draws the cartoons

of the master of Religious Knowledge,

demolish the pages of the Koran.

You must know how to build your own paradise

On this black soil.’

(Advice to Our Children, 1928)

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